Photo courtesy of The Teeritz Agenda

Gran Turismo – A 007 Travel Guide

By Wesley Britton. Re-published with additional material by Matt Sherman. It all began with Ian Lancaster Fleming’s richly descriptive James Bond novels. During the 1950s, when the first seven 007 books appeared, Bond was a globetrotting tourist with many travel scenes at a time when thrillers were designed for an international market. Descriptions of gentlemen’s…

Harry's Bar

Pink Lights and Champagne: James Bond in Paris

Article by David Salter In “From a View to a Kill” the first short story in Ian Fleming’s collection “For Your Eyes Only” (1960)  the reader gets a comprehensive but compressed description of James Bond’s Paris. Bond is sitting on the terrace of Fouquet’s in the Champs Elysees, drinking an Americano, one of the ‘musical…

Beppu Hell

Our Man in Japan: James Bond in Kyushu

Article by Graham M. Thomas It was 1999 when I last visited the island of Kyushu in southwest Japan. Literary007 was then just but a faint twinkle in an eye. Now in 2017, I decided to make a return visit in an attempt to retrace Fleming’s and Bond’s own journeys across the island. Within the…

Review: Some Kind of Hero by Ajay Chowdhury and Matthew Field

Article by Robert Rakison In 2015 Matthew Field’s and Ajay Chowdhury’s “Some Kind of Hero: The Remarkable Story of the James Bond Films” was published by The History Press. On July 2nd, a revised and updated paperback edition is being issued which, we’re told, will include new chapters on Spectre, the upcoming Bond 25 and…

Surveying the Bond Competition: Part 2

Article by Mike Ripley. If the release of the film Dr No in 1962 triggered an almost instant boom in British spy and thriller fiction and a positive tsunami of new authors, the same cannot be said of the publication of Casino Royale which gave birth to the Bond legend in 1953. New Arrivals, 1953…

Six to Four Against – The Spy Who Loved Me

Article by Frieda Toth “. . . Bond’s refined tastes and effortless embrace of the high life form an important aspect of his image.”  JFK and the Masculine Mystique: Sex and Power on the New Frontier In 1962, Ian’s masterpiece came out. The Spy Who Loved Me was everything he had striven for, and he’d jettisoned everything tiresome. …

Surveying the Bond Competition – Part 1

Article by Mike Ripley When I began to write Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, my ‘reader’s history’ of the boom in British thrillers in the 1950s and 1960s, it was clear that my starting point had to be the game-changer that was Ian Fleming’s Casino Royale in 1953. After the book came out, Len Deighton got…

Ian Fleming’s Literary Legacy – The Spy Fantasy

Article by David Craggs In October 2016, this sexagenarian espionage aficionado waxed lyrical about Fleming’s legacy and the door he opened for realistic spy fiction. A literary furrow that was initially plowed with great aplomb by Len Deighton and Le Carre and which has been studiously followed ever since. Although Fleming can be credited for…

A Deadly Career by Gerry Wadsworth

‘A Deadly Career’ by Gerald Wadsworth

Artistic Licence Renewed is delighted to help unveil Gerald Wadsworth’s latest James Bond painting, “A Deadly Career”. The painting recorded Bond’s life as a spy & assassin for Her Majesty’s Government. Matt Sherman of the Bond Fan Events site tells us more. Last year, the International Spy Museum in Washington DC commissioned Gerry to provide…

Torao Saito mid 1950s

Who was the real Tiger Tanaka?

Article by Graham M. Thomas The dedication in You Only Live Twice reads, ‘TO Richard Hughes and Torao Saito BUT FOR WHOM ETC…. Richard Hughes and Torao ‘Tiger’ Saito were two friends of Fleming’s. Both were journalists, both had accompanied Fleming on his travels through Japan, and both had now been metamorphosed into characters in…

James Bond: Last of the Clubland Heroes?

Article by David Salter In 1953 “Clubland Heroes”, by Richard Usborne was published. This seminal work  – “A nostalgic study of some of the recurrent characters in the romantic fiction of Dornford Yates, John Buchan and Sapper” – has become the go-to reference work for anyone interested in English thrillers of the immediate pre First…

James Bond vs. the USSR

Article by Michael Connick There is no doubt that government officials of the Soviet Union, and especially those in the KGB, viewed Ian Fleming’s James Bond stories as dangerous anti-Soviet propaganda. Both the books and films were banned in the Soviet Union. Komsomolskaya Pravda, the official newspaper of the All-Union Leninist Young Communist League, blasted…

©Julian Parrott, 2017

Literary 007 Tourism: Inside Ian Fleming’s Goldeneye

Article by ©Julian Parrott, 2017 There isn’t much of Ian Fleming’s Jamaica left these days. Perhaps there never really was. Fleming’s Jamaica was only a momentary period in his own nostalgic yearnings for an ideal of the British Empire. Jamaica was an idyll where he could ignore the Empire’s inexorable death throes and home-nation decline.…