Ian Fleming and Sefton Delmer

It can be argued that Sefton Delmer is the Godfather of what we commonly refer to as ‘fake news’. In old money, this was propaganda. Delmer’s “Black Propaganda,” was a disinformation war waged over the airwaves and mixed real news culled from intelligence sources and fake items. He even he produced a German-language newspaper called…

The Three Faces of Blofeld

Ian Fleming’s Seven Deadlier Sins: SNOBBERY

Article by Revelator This month we conclude our 7 part series inspired by Ian Fleming’s “Seven Deadlier Sins.” Fleming conceived the idea for a series on the Seven Deadly Sins in the Sunday Times, and though it did not materialize for the paper, a book was published in 1962 that contained essays by some of…

22 Ebury Street

The London Homes of Ian Fleming

Article by David Salter Ian Fleming, like his alter ego James Bond was a Londoner. Born here in 1908, he lived and worked here all his life, until his death in 1964. This long attachment was broken up by his schooldays at Eton, childhood days at the family home, Joyce Grove in Oxfordshire, his time…

A Family Affair: The Other Fleming Writers

Ian Fleming sits as one of the most famous and successful thriller writers of all time, who casts a long shadow over his peers, and not least his own family. Here we look at some other talented Fleming writers, spanning multiple generations. Peter Fleming Ian’s older brother Peter needs little introduction. As a highly successful travel…

For Club and Country

For Club and Country – The Inspirations for Blades Club

Article by David Salter and Jonathan Cull. For Bond devotees of London’s clubland, it is of some interest to watch Blade’s, M’s club, gradually turn, as the books progress, from a 20th century version of its sybaritic predecessor, the Scavoir Vivre*, into straightforward Boodle’s. Fleming usually lunched at Boodle’s and was devoted to it. He stated that a…

Agent of Influence – Jeremy Duns on Antony Terry

“Have no fear,” Fleming advises reporter Antony Terry in 1955, “you are by far the best correspondent in Germany and all you have to do is to write what you think and not be afraid of it”  (Lenart, Judith, comp. Yours Ever Ian Fleming: Letters to and from Antony Terry. Nelson, New Zealand: Printhouse Nelson…

Expedition Fleming: Writer, Traveller, Soldier, Spy

Article by Dannielle Shaw ‘One reads him for literary delight and for the pleasure of meeting an Elizabethan spirit allied to a modern mind’. Vita Sackville-West on Peter Fleming. The hybrid role of soldier-travellers and traveller-intelligencers has long been a complementary but complex pairing. Peter Fleming was a soldier-writer, a travel-writing soldier, and a serving…

Richard Hughes in Sydney in 1955 (Photo: Sydney Morning Herald)

Richard Hughes: Ian Fleming’s Man in the Orient

In the original typescript to Ian Fleming’s You Only Live Twice, held at the Lily Library in Indiana, there is a very interesting “Author’s note” prefixing the manuscript. Fleming wrote that on his second visit to Japan, he followed “as closely as prudence would allow, in the footsteps of James Bond.” He was accompanied by the…

Joyce Grove

The Country Homes of Ian Fleming

Article by Edward Biddulph We tend to associate Ian Fleming with Goldeneye, his winter home in Jamaica, and London, where he spent much of his time, for instance at the Admiralty during the Second World War, at the Sunday Times afterwards, in his Mayfair clubs, or his own office in Mitre Court. Weekends, however, would…

Ian Fleming’s Seven ‘Deadlier’ Sins: CRUELTY

Article by Revelator In his foreword The Seven Deadly Sins, published in 1962, Ian Fleming declared that the traditional seven deadly sins — PRIDE, ENVY, ANGER, SLOTH [accidie], COVETOUSNESS, GLUTTONY and LUST — were no longer sufficient. Thereupon, he proposed seven deadlier sins more worthy of a one way ticket to Hell: AVARICE, CRUELTY, HYPOCRISY,…

An Epicurean Guide to Ian Fleming’s London

“If one eats badly in England-or in any other country, for that matter-it is generally one’s own fault” – Ian Fleming. In 1956, one could be forgiven for not being able to find the finest in English cuisine. Fleming was in a rather more privileged position to sample the best of English cooking from his homes…