The Folio Society Publish The Spy Who Loved Me

Nobody Does It Better than the Folio Society… For this edition, The Folio Society has also reintroduced Ian Fleming’s original prologue, which had been removed from all modern editions of the text. In an unusual move by the author, this short introduction suggests that the manuscript had been left on his desk by Vivienne Michel,…

Six to Four Against – The Spy Who Loved Me

Article by Frieda Toth “. . . Bond’s refined tastes and effortless embrace of the high life form an important aspect of his image.”  JFK and the Masculine Mystique: Sex and Power on the New Frontier In 1962, Ian’s masterpiece came out. The Spy Who Loved Me was everything he had striven for, and he’d jettisoned everything tiresome. …

Frieda Toth

Interview with Frieda Toth

This week we head Stateside to talk to Frieda Toth, to discuss Ian Fleming’s visits to New England and his inspirations for novels such as The Spy Who Loved Me and For Your Eyes Only. 001: What began your interest in Fleming and Bond? My High School boyfriend–whom I eventually married!– loved James Bond movies and…

Ian Fleming’s Seven ‘Deadlier’ Sins: CRUELTY

Article by Revelator In his foreword The Seven Deadly Sins, published in 1962, Ian Fleming declared that the traditional seven deadly sins — PRIDE, ENVY, ANGER, SLOTH [accidie], COVETOUSNESS, GLUTTONY and LUST — were no longer sufficient. Thereupon, he proposed seven deadlier sins more worthy of a one way ticket to Hell: AVARICE, CRUELTY, HYPOCRISY,…

The Spy Who Loved Me – A Very Personal Story

Article by David Craggs For many Bond literary aficionados The Spy Who Loved Me was and remains an anomaly. It represented a brave departure in terms of format and style and when published back in 1962, it garnered Ian Fleming the worst critical reviews of his career. He consequently lobbied Jonathan Cape to suppress the…

Braziers Park

A Tour Through Ian Fleming’s Oxfordshire

Article by Edward Biddulph If you were asked to name the places with which Ian Fleming is most closely associated, you would almost certainly put Goldeneye, Fleming’s the winter home in Jamaica where he wrote all the Bond books, on the top of your list. Further reflection might bring to mind his London properties, among…

Bond Women Redux: From Trigger Mortis to Spectre

In the last few months, the James Bond universe has given us some new ‘Bond Women’ to the canon from Trigger Mortis to Spectre. On the fifth anniversary of his ground breaking book about feminism and the representations of women in the 007 novels and films, we checked in with Robert Caplen to get his opinions. What are your reactions to…

Fleming, Ian Fleming

Ian Fleming’s Seven ‘Deadlier’ Sins: HYPOCRISY

In his foreword to the book The Seven Deadly Sins, published in 1962; Fleming declared that the traditional seven deadly sins — PRIDE, ENVY, ANGER, SLOTH [accidie], COVETOUSNESS, GLUTTONY and LUST — were no longer sufficient. Thereupon, he proposed seven deadlier sins more worthy of a one way ticket to Hell, which were: AVARICE, CRUELTY, HYPOCRISY, MALICE, MORAL…

The Three Ages of Bond: Part 3 – Suffering Bond (1961-1964)

Article by Revelator After For Your Eyes Only Bond was no longer a wonderful machine. Nor was he a fully-dimensional, complex human being—that would involve surrendering his role as a male-fantasy projection—but he was considerably more human than before. Why? Because Ian Fleming failed. He explained why in an interview with Counterpoint: Now, you’ll notice that…

The Spy Who Loved Me Dust Jacket

The Spy Who Loved Me was published on 16 April 1962 in the UK as a hardcover edition by publishers Jonathan Cape; it was 221 pages long and cost 15 shillings. Artist Richard Chopping once again undertook the cover art, and raised his fee from the 200 guineas he had charged for Thunderball, to 250 guineas. The artwork included a commando knifewhich was borrowed from…