Ian Fleming’s Seven ‘Deadlier’ Sins: CRUELTY

Article by Revelator In his foreword The Seven Deadly Sins, published in 1962, Ian Fleming declared that the traditional seven deadly sins — PRIDE, ENVY, ANGER, SLOTH [accidie], COVETOUSNESS, GLUTTONY and LUST — were no longer sufficient. Thereupon, he proposed seven deadlier sins more worthy of a one way ticket to Hell: AVARICE, CRUELTY, HYPOCRISY,…

Field Report: “Diamonds Are Forever at 60 (and 45)”

Submitted by: Oliver Buckton, Professor of English, Florida Atlantic University, South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA) Conference, Jacksonville, FL, November 4-6 2016. The 88th South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA) Convention—held in Jacksonville, Florida, from November 4-6, 2016– proved to be, among other things a festival of James Bond and Ian Fleming. There were two panels…

Red Grant | ©George Almond

Ian Fleming’s Seven ‘Deadlier’ Sins: MALICE

In his foreword to the book The Seven Deadly Sins, published in 1962; Fleming declared that the traditional seven deadly sins — PRIDE, ENVY, ANGER, SLOTH, COVETOUSNESS, GLUTTONY and LUST — were no longer sufficient. He proposed seven deadlier sins more worthy of a one way ticket to Hell: AVARICE, CRUELTY, HYPOCRISY, MALICE, MORAL COWARDICE,…

Ian Fleming’s Seven ‘Deadlier’ Sins: MORAL COWARDICE

Article Benjamin Welton In Jules Dassin’s classic crime film Rififi, Louise (played by Janine Darcey) chides her husband, the gangster Jo le Suedois (played by Austrian actor Carl Möhner), for moral cowardice. Specifically, Louise, in a fit of frustration, tells her husband that it’s not the criminals or those who have chosen to flee the responsibilities…

Exclusive Interview with Oliver Buckton on ‘Espionage in British Fiction and Film Since 1900’

This week we caught up with Oliver Buckton, whose new book Espionage in British Fiction and Film Since 1900, explores the origins of the British spy story while keeping in focus the essential role of the “changing enemy”—the chief adversary of and threat to Britain and its allies—in the evolution of spy fiction and cinema. Using an innovative structure,…

'M' - Illustration by George Almond

Who was Sir Miles Messervy? – The Men Who Were ‘M’

Article by Benjamin Welton; Featured Image by George Almond Ian Fleming was fortunate in that he had a lot to draw from once he sat down to create James Bond. Not only did he have literary forbearers such as W. Somerset Maugham, Sapper, and Raymond Chandler to emulate, but his actual life was swimming in…