Len Deighton with Mike Ripley

Mike Ripley’s ‘Kiss Kiss Bang Bang’

KISS KISS, BANG BANG is a reader’s history of the boom in British thrillers 1953-1975 (roughly, Casino Royale to The Eagle Has Landed), a period when Britain lost an Empire, was demoted in terms of global power and status and was economically crippled by debt yet its fictional spies, secret agents, soldiers, sailors and even (occasionally)…

Ian Fleming’s Seven ‘Deadlier’ Sins: CRUELTY

Article by Revelator In his foreword The Seven Deadly Sins, published in 1962, Ian Fleming declared that the traditional seven deadly sins — PRIDE, ENVY, ANGER, SLOTH [accidie], COVETOUSNESS, GLUTTONY and LUST — were no longer sufficient. Thereupon, he proposed seven deadlier sins more worthy of a one way ticket to Hell: AVARICE, CRUELTY, HYPOCRISY,…

Field Report: Nick from A Gentleman’s Jotter

This week we welcome a fine gentleman in from the cold to discuss his love of Fleming and appreciation of Richard Chopping’s iconic dust jackets. What is your favourite Chopping cover and why? Without a doubt, Thunderball. It incapsulates the world of Fleming’s Bond so perfectly. I remember the first time I saw it in…

The Spy Who Loved Me – A Very Personal Story

Article by David Craggs For many Bond literary aficionados The Spy Who Loved Me was and remains an anomaly. It represented a brave departure in terms of format and style and when published back in 1962, it garnered Ian Fleming the worst critical reviews of his career. He consequently lobbied Jonathan Cape to suppress the…